Yara El Safi: I’m Okay Review

The exhibition I’m Okay at DNA Artspace includes small scale intricate drawings and painting of warped and snarled lands that appears to be swallowed up within itself. The title of the show, I’m Okay, is a common expression when asked the state of your well being, which is an interesting contrast to the exhibition pieces. Viewing the work, it was evident the artist is dealing with very real anxiety about the state of the environment, specifically sinkholes and the inadequate knowledge behind them. Jenna’s work though very dark and highlights a uncertain reality, the work has a essence of positivity and affirmation of optimism. Jenna’s use of text in her work is strangely figurative. The words animate the positivity and strangeness of sinkholes. The warped landscapes are colourful, playful and attractive, very referential to science book diagrams, and this asks the viewer to see a the reality of sinkholes as interactive, playful and positive.

Yara El Safi: I’m Okay Review

Fused/Division at The Arts Project- Sophie

This past Thursday we celebrated at the reception for my 4th year seminar exhibition at the Arts Project Gallery in downtown London. With the works of eleven different artists, it was rewarding to see the final result of a year’s worth of work that went into each very personal piece. As a whole, the projects were very different from each other, ranging from drawing, to textile, to sculpture, and painting but they all also fit into a more representational category of art-making which was a bit of a departure from a more conceptual experience over the last four years.  Fused/Division is a very pleasant show to experience, where one could sit back on a leather couch in Gosia Martiniak’s installation and read the graphic novel she illustrated, or contemplate the detail and hours that must have gone into Emily Copeland’s photo- realist “Stacks” drawings. Because everyone had one project to focus on for the whole year, students were free and driven to work on something they were thoroughly passionate about and enjoyed creating. It’s no question that a large portion of the success that accompanies Allie Kallifer’s work is her pure enjoyment and enthusiasm that goes into making each vibrant and colourful abstract expressionist painting. The show had an amazing turnout and it was a wonderful way to end my undergraduate career.

Fused/Division at The Arts Project- Sophie

Danny / Gallery Review

On Thursday, March 19 2015, I attended David Rokeby’s artist talk and opening reception of Very Nervous System (1983-2004) at the McIntosh Gallery located on Western University’s campus. Passing through the ruby doors of the gallery, I individualistically made movements towards Rokeby’s installation. Upon entering Very Nervous System (1983-2004) I acknowledged a singular beam of light surrounded by an empty room accompanied by wall mounted speakers. I found my body negotiating between being in a space and observing an occurrence. When touched by the rays of light, unattractive and unfamiliar sounds were emitted from the walls surrounding me. The relationship between my body movement and sound emitted was made simple through Rokeby’s synchronization of technology. My movement became the dictator of destabilizing sound. Having to question the location of control allowed Rokeby’s work to be digested as an experience rather than an instrument to be played or mastered. Very Nervous System (1983-2004) acted as a prosthetic to my participation. While in the spotlight, my demeanor and bodily gesture became frantic and sporadic. I dropped to the floor, spun in circles and jumped up and down acting as a spontaneous trigger to Rokeby’s installation. When thinking about Rokeby’s artistic hand within the work, the role of a composer came to mind. Rokeby allowed the outcome of my experience to be influenced by my own personal history. The way I conducted my movements within his space was undeniably different than the gestures of other participants. Rokeby enabled viewers to hone and express themselves through technological intervention.

Danny / Gallery Review

Danny / Gallery Review

On Thursday, March 19 2015, I attended David Rokeby’s artist talk and opening reception of Very Nervous System (1983-2004) at the McIntosh Gallery located on Western University’s campus. Passing through the ruby doors of the gallery, I individualistically made movements towards Rokeby’s installation. Upon entering Very Nervous System (1983-2004) I acknowledged a singular beam of light surrounded by an empty room accompanied by wall mounted speakers. I found my body negotiating between being in a space and observing an occurrence. When touched by the rays of light, unattractive and unfamiliar sounds were emitted from the walls surrounding me. The relationship between my body movement and sound emitted was made simple through Rokeby’s synchronization of technology. My movement became the dictator of destabilizing sound. Having to question the location of control allowed Rokeby’s work to be digested as an experience rather than an instrument to be played or mastered. Very Nervous System (1983-2004) acted as a prosthetic to my participation. While in the spotlight, my demeanor and bodily gesture became frantic and sporadic. I dropped to the floor, spun in circles and jumped up and down acting as a spontaneous trigger to Rokeby’s installation. When thinking about Rokeby’s artistic hand within the work, the role of a composer came to mind. Rokeby allowed the outcome of my experience to be influenced by my own personal history. The way I conducted my movements within his space was undeniably different than the gestures of other participants. Rokeby enabled viewers to hone and express themselves through technological intervention.

Danny / Gallery Review